Featherfin Squeaker

Featherfin Squeaker, Featherfin Synodontis, Hi fin Squeaker

Family: Mochokidae

The Featherfin Catfish is a beautiful fish with sensitive lacy fins and a polka dot fancy patterning!

The Featherfin Squeaker is considered to be one of the ‘upside-down’ catfish species. Like their well-known relatives, the Upside-Down Catfish Synodontis nigriventris, they can swim upside down at will. Featherfin squeakers are called such due to their ability to make noises to communicate with one another during spawning time and also as a warning to predators. The squeaking is accomplished by rubbing the spines of its pectoral fins into grooves on its shoulders. Other common names they are known by include Featherfin Catfish, Hi Fin Squeaker and Featherfin Synodontis. They are also referred to as the Lace Cat or Synodontis Lace Catfish, though this name is more often applied to its very similar cousin the Lace Synodontis Synodontis nigrita.

The Featherfin Squeaker is a great choice as a durable and attractive bottom scavenger. When kept singly they make a very handsome and intriguing showpiece, and are particularly active when feeding. They are also compatible with others of their own genus as long as the tank is large enough with plenty of rocks or driftwood for places of refuge. Each fish will pick a particular spot under a piece of driftwood or in a hole to call their own. When kept with others of their own species, they will often frolic and chase each other through tunnels and holes in a well decorated aquarium.

Featherfin Catfish are fairly hardy fish. A minimum aquarium size of 50 gallons is suggested. They are not difficult to keep in a well maintained environment and will get along well with other fish in a large community aquarium. Most other tank mates, both large and small, will get along fine as long as they aren’t bottom dwellers feeding in the same area. Small bottoms feeders like Corydoras or Otocinclus can be at risk. Yet even more aggressive fish, like African cichlids, can make good tank mates for these attractive scavengers.

For Information on keeping freshwater fish, see:
Freshwater Aquarium Guide: Aquarium Setup and Care

Scientific Classification

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Actinopterygii
  • Order: Siluriformes
  • Family: Mochokidae
  • Genus: Synodontis
  • Species: eupterus

Featherfin Squeaker – Quick Aquarium Care

  • Aquarist Experience Level: Beginner
  • Size of fish – inches: 11.8 inches (30.00 cm)
  • Minimum Tank Size: 50 gal (189 L)
  • Temperament: Semi-aggressive
  • Aquarium Hardiness: Very Hardy
  • Temperature: 72.0 to 81.0° F (22.2 to 27.2° C)

Habitat: Distribution / Background

The Featherfin Squeaker Synodontis eupterus was described by Boulenger in 1901. They inhabit much of central Africa, including Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Ghana, Mali, Niger, and Cameroon. They are found in the famous White Nile river system as well. Other common names they are known by include Featherfin Catfish, Featherfin Synodontis, Synodontis Lace Catfish, Hi Fin Squeaker and Lace Cat. Due to their wide distribution they are not considered threatened and are listed as Least Concern (LC) on the IUCN Red List of endangered species.

Featherfin Catfish prefer living near muddy or rocky bottoms of rivers in their natural habitat, preying upon insect larvae and even eating algae. They prefer moderately fast flowing rivers. Like most catfish, they are primarily scavengers and will eat most available items that are edible. Featherfin Synodontis enjoy each other’s company in the wild and often live in small, fluctuating groups.

  • Scientific Name: Synodontis eupterus
  • Social Grouping: Groups – Can be kept singly or in groups
  • IUCN Red List: LC – Least Concern

Description

Featherfin Squeaker

Featherfin Squeaker

The Featherfin Squeaker is fairly large and a long-lived catfish. It can get up to 11.8 inches (30 cm) in length, though they usually only obtain 6 – 8” (15-20 cm) in the aquarium. They commonly have a lifespan of 8 to 10 years, but there are reports of them living up to 28 years.

Featherfin Catfish have a flattened underside and triangular flanks leading up to their sharp, spined dorsal fin that develops lacy extensions on the adults. The barbels are quite pronounced and very flexible allowing them to seek food and warn other competitors off with a ‘tickle’. These catfish are often spotted or patterned with varying degrees of browns and sometimes grays. Called Featherfin Synodontis, they are particularly noted for their huge, feathery fins. Because Featherfins can range greatly in color, they can easily be confused with similar Synodontis species and are often sold as a completely different species.

Juveniles and adults often look completely different and the young do not have the distinctive dorsal fin extensions. When young these fish can easily be misidentified with their close relative, the Upside-Down Catfish Synodontis nigriventris. But once the Featherfin Synodontis grows well past four inches their identity becomes clear.

Synodontis are known as squeaker catfish because they produce a squeaking sound by rubbing the spines of the pectoral fins into grooves on the shoulders. They use this sound as a warning to both predators and competitors during spawning time. Like their relatives the Upside-Down Catfish, they can also swim upside down at will. For identification, their distinctive characteristics are the long, flowing fins, delicately spotted body, and their eventual adult size.

  • Size of fish – inches: 11.8 inches (30.00 cm) – They usually only obtain 6-8” (15-20 cm) in the aquarium.
  • Lifespan: 28 years – Up to 28 years, but more commonly 8-10 years.

Fish Keeping Difficulty

The Featherfin Squeaker perfectly fits the definition of a hardy fish. Featherfins can withstand a variety of water conditions, food types, and tank mates. They are survivors and very few of the common beginner mistakes adversely effects them. Tanks can be extremely dirty since this mimics much of their natural habitat, though a dirty tank is not recommended. One thing they do require though is a decently size aquarium, preferably over 50 gallons.

  • Aquarium Hardiness: Very Hardy
  • Aquarist Experience Level: Beginner

Foods and Feeding

Featherfin Synodontis are omnivores that feed on insect larvae, algae, and any other foods source they can scavenge in the wild. In the aquarium they are not hard to feed at all. They are enthusiastic eaters will consume nearly any food they can locate with a rambunctious attitude. Even though they prefer to be under cover during day time, the tantalizing smell of food in the water will often bring them out of their domain for a good feasting time. Meaty foods, vegetable tablets, and anything in between will be appreciated by these hardy eaters. Once weekly feeding of bloodworms, tubifex, brine shrimp and other meaty foods will complete the perfect diet. They should be fed just before the lights are turned off, because, like most catfish, they are nocturnal.

  • Diet Type: Omnivore
  • Flake Food: Yes
  • Tablet / Pellet: Yes
  • Live foods (fishes, shrimps, worms): Some of Diet
  • Vegetable Food: Some of Diet
  • Meaty Food: Some of Diet
  • Feeding Frequency: Daily

Aquarium Care

These Synodontis are not picky about their aquarium conditions. Little maintenance has to be done to keep them in good condition. Regular siphoning of the gravel is recommended to remove waste and keep the tank in a clean state.The recommended water change is 10 – 15% every other week to keep up with the bio-load..

  • Water Changes: Bi-weekly – Bi-Weekly water changes of 10 – 15% are recommended to keep the tank from becoming heavily fouled.

Aquarium Setup

A minimum 50 gallon aquarium is recommended for a full-sized Featherfin Squeaker. This Synodontis catfish enjoys a tank with lots of hiding places, particularly driftwood. They have fun chasing each other around all the tunnels and holes, while feeling secure under the driftwood. Once they find their favorite spot, they will stay there much of their lives unless the tank is revamped or a competitor out competes them for the space. Porous rocks used for African cichlid tanks, are also welcomed by these catfish. Substrate should be sand or some type of smooth gravel to reduce the chance of barbel damage. Plants also provide cover, but they must be tough and resilient since these catfish often shove€™ away anything in their path.

  • Minimum Tank Size: 50 gal (189 L)
  • Suitable for Nano Tank: No
  • Substrate Type: Sand/Gravel Mix – Sand or smooth gravel will help reduce the chance of barbel damage.
  • Lighting Needs: Low – subdued lighting – Will appreciated overhangs and hiding places in more brightly lit aquariums.
  • Temperature: 72.0 to 81.0° F (22.2 to 27.2° C)
  • Range ph: 5.6-7.5
  • Hardness Range: 8 – 20 dGH
  • Brackish: No
  • Water Movement: Moderate
  • Water Region: Bottom

Social Behaviors

Featherfin Catfish are not aggressive, but they aren’t necessarily peaceful either. Featherfin fall into the range of semi-aggressive. They pose little risk to small fish that swim in the middle or top of the tank, but can harass smaller bottom feeders like Corydoras or Otocinclus. Also, they tend to be food hogs, so weak, slow eating fish will often find they have missed out at feeding time!

The Featherfin Squeaker enjoys the company of its own genus, but like the majority of Synodontis they have an intricate hierarchy system, mainly based on size. The most dominant Featherfin will get the best hiding place. The ‘species internal’ bullying is rarely life threatening but can cause substantial stress which may lead to illness. Watch for any individual fish getting bullied too much. Featherfins are often an excellent addition in African Cichlid tanks.

  • Venomous: No
  • Temperament: Semi-aggressive – Though basically a peaceful fish, they will harass other bottom feeders.
  • Compatible with:
    • Same species – conspecifics: Yes – They can be kept with other Synodontis if the tank is large with many hiding places.
    • Peaceful fish (): Monitor – Be cautious with smaller bottoms feeders like Corydoras or Otocinclus that compete for food.
    • Semi-Aggressive (): Safe – Can usually be kept with semi-aggressive and even aggressive fish such as Rift Lake cichlids.
    • Aggressive (): Monitor
    • Large Semi-Aggressive (): Safe
    • Large Aggressive, Predatory (): Monitor
    • Slow Swimmers & Eaters (): Monitor – Synodontis are food hogs and slow eaters may not get enough to eat.
    • Shrimps, Crabs, Snails: Threat – is aggressive – Featherfin Synodontis enjoy consuming snails.
    • Plants: Safe

Sex: Sexual differences

Females are usually larger than males with a bigger girth. They often develop pot bellies.

Breeding / Reproduction

Synodontis eupterus has never been bred naturally in captivity, so there is a likelihood that pet shop specimens were bred from hormone injected parents, which is not readily available or recommended for an inexperienced hobbyist to accomplish.

  • Ease of Breeding: Unknown – This fish has been bred in fish farms with the help of added hormones, however breeding is unknown in the home aquarium.

Fish Diseases

Synodontis eupterus are very hardy fish and have no diseases they are particularly effected by. However, they are subject to the same diseases as other tropical fish. For information about freshwater fish diseases and illnesses, see Aquarium Fish Diseases and Treatments.

High nitrate levels can cause Feather-fin catfish to develop infected barbels; this makes it difficult for them to navigate and eat normally. It is recommended to maintain nitrate levels below 20 ppm.

The best way to proactively prevent disease is to give your Feather-fin Catfish the proper environment and give them a well-balanced diet. The closer to their natural habitat the less stress the fish will have, making them healthier and happy. A stressed fish will is more likely to acquire disease.

Remember anything you add to your tank can bring disease to your tank. Not only other fish but plants, substrate, and decorations can harbor bacteria. Take great care and make sure to properly clean or quarantine anything that you add to an established tank so not to upset the balance.

Because they are a scaleless fish, catfish can be treated with pimafix or melafix but should not be treated with potassium permanganate or copper based medications. Malachite green or formalin can be used at one half to one-fourth the recommended dosage. All medications should be used with caution.

For information about freshwater fish diseases and illnesses, see Aquarium Fish Diseases and Treatments.

Availability

The Featherfin Squeaker is generally available from pet stores and online. They are priced moderately.

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